Why your ongoing support is important

JHASW is the only Jewish Heritage charity operating in Wales. Most of the work we have accomplished so far has been dependent on grants from the National Lottery Heritage Fund, the Jewish Historical Society of England, the Jewish Memorial Council, Cardiff University and support from the community. However, we are acutely aware that there is so much to do that does not fall within the remit of these specific projects and without long-term financial support we will not be able to continue our work preserving and sharing the local Jewish heritage in the way it deserves.

Donate to JHASW

If you would like to help us with our work by making an online donation please click on the Donate button.

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you would prefer to send a cheque or Charity Voucher, please download, complete and return the Donation form.

If you would like to use Gift Aid, please download, complete and return the Gift Aid Form.

You can also help us raise funds via Easyfundraising when you do your online shopping and it won't cost you a penny!

With extra funding we could...

Continue to conduct oral histories with elders from the local Jewish communities, past and present.

 

During our first project in 2018/19 we conducted 77 oral history interviews, including one with Arnold Krotosky, the last kosher butcher in Cardiff. Arnold was born in 1922 and died on 30 March 2019. Fortunately, we succeeded in recording his memories and experiences for future generations.

Of the original 77 interviewees, 9 have since died.

 

We know that there are others who wish to have their stories recorded, and that time is a factor, but we do not have the resources to continue this work.

Continue to digitise and preserve documents, photographs and objects relating to south Welsh Jewry. 

 

In October 2017, we rescued from being destroyed /salvaged from being thrown away/prevented destruction of the records of the Newport Jewish community: minute books, financial records, photos, and various material relating to the life of the congregation. We were fortunate to have been able to intercept the material, which had already been placed in the green recycling bags and awaited the waste collection. The records, going back to 1859, were in poor condition; they were treated for de-infestation, cleaned and deposited with the Gwent Archives.

Educate the wider public about the importance of the historic Jewish communities in south Wales and the contributions they made to the commercial, social, and artistic life of the area. 

 

Peoples’ Collection Wales describe in detail how JHASW project material was used as the primary example in papers submitted at International Conference of Museums (ICOM) 2019 in Kyoto, Japan, because of the quality of their content:

‘As a model, the JHASW is an excellent example of how heritage content can be digitised and made available to a wider audience through means which meet national archival standards. Particular attention was drawn to the standard of their metadata, which not only contained comprehensive titles and descriptions for every item but also transcriptions and geolocation information which ensures that their content is discoverable and usable to other PCW users.’

 

Glamorgan Archives commented:

‘The work of JHASW volunteers in transcribing and digitising the archive material prior to transfer has streamlined the cataloguing process for us and provided digital surrogates which can be used as access copies where required, ensuring the preservation of the original material, in particular any especially fragile items.

As a result, the history of the Jewish community in south Wales is now better recognised, interpreted, disseminated and preserved for the benefit of the local community, people across Wales and beyond, and generations to come.’

There are also benefits to the volunteers who work on the project.

 

‘I believe it has helped me become more open and understanding towards religious beliefs, myself being of no religion. I knew nothing really of Judaism beforehand and am glad to have gained so much knowledge of the religion and its impact on South Wales.’ (Molly)

 

‘This volunteering has been extremely beneficial and worthwhile. It has given me a sense of purpose and pride as I believe very strongly in the aims of the project. […] I have also met many likeminded people through the project who share my interest in history and heritage.’ (Lettie)

 

‘Having completed this internship I have gained invaluable skills which will help me standout on an application form. It has given me a greater understanding of how archival materials are stored and the work going in to digitising documents. It has also given me knowledge about Jewish beliefs which is vital to prevent misunderstandings and prejudices.’ (Tabitha)

 

‘The placement provided me with a qualification in Digitising for Museums, Archives, and Libraries, as well as informing me and giving me valuable experience in working within the heritage sector.; (Thomas)

 

‘[I gained] A sense of achievement and increased local knowledge. During the lockdown it provided a reason to get up in the morning, a sense of purpose and a worthwhile occupation.’ (Ann)

 

‘This knowledge has given me an interest in Jewish communities. The specific research we have carried out on experiences involving the Holocaust has made me understand the events on a more human level- there have been humbling moments in studying emotional areas. I think this research has been a great benefit to me within my university studies and in my personal life.’ (Alice)

And sometimes our work has outcomes that we never imagined.

 

This is an email we received from John Farnhill, one of our volunteers, in August 2020.

 

“Thought I’d let you know that as a result of my research into Adolph Rosenthal, Tom Rosenberg, his grandson has made contact with his second cousin, Barbara Booth of Leighton Buzzard.

 

Until last year Tom knew little about his grandfather’s life, or his extended family. Of Barbara he knew nothing.

 

Barbara is the granddaughter Adolf Rosenthal’s sister  (as well as being the granddaughter of Pauline Zander), and has been great assistance in my work. She’d heard of Tom but didn’t know where he fitted in the family.

 

When I joined as a volunteer, I never thought that I’d end up re-uniting two branches of a family after 80 years. Most meaningful thing I’ve done for a long time."

Donate to JHASW

If you would like to help us with our work by making an online donation please click on the Donate button.

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you would prefer to send a cheque or Charity Voucher, please download, complete and return the Donation form.

If you would like to use Gift Aid, please download, complete and return the Gift Aid Form.

You can also help us raise funds via Easyfundraising when you do your online shopping and it won't cost you a penny!

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Should you identify any unlawful content published by JHASW on this website, such as material that infringes copyright, you should contact us and ask for the material to be removed. Please include a description of the material and where it was found, the nature of your complaint, and a statement that you are the rights' owner or are authorised to act for the rights' owner.

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